Vegan wardrobe: get rid of silk!

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This post is the second in a series of four.

My second battle to make my wardrobe cruelty-free was against silk.

Silk is the fibre that silkworms weave to make cocoons and the only way to obtain silk is to boil or to gas the worms alive inside their cocoons. So, since I became a vegan I have thought silkworms’ lives were much more worth than my look.

With my casual feminine style, my closet was overflowing with silk dresses and blouses. It’s a fact that I really love feminine floral print dresses! So, I was a bit nervous to get rid of them and annoyed not to be able to find new alternative pieces as beautiful as those.

The check I did in my closet also exposed a large number of decorations made up of silk like belts or pockets embedded in clothes. Some of them were easy to remove. So, as a first step, I kept a few clothes cleared of their silk but I pulled out the others. I won’t even mention the wool/silk mix fabrics I knew I should throw straight away. But I became completely upset when I realised that the vast majority of my supposed 100% cotton jumper was, in fact, cotton/silk mix fabrics.

Actually, my worries were for nothing because alternatives to silk are plentiful: nylon, milkweed seed pod fibres, silk-cotton tree and ceiba tree filaments, polyester, and rayon. In addition, all of them are less expensive by far!

There is an endless choice of beautiful clothes. I  selected a sample of dresses and even in brands where no one would expect synthetic fabrics!

Click on the picture to see brands and textures.

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As another good alternative to silk, I have learnt to sew my own skirts and dresses. Do you remember my skirt? It’s an infinite delight to spend hours in textile shops, touching, comparing different fabrics and finally deciding to purchase the most beautiful print. There is nothing more gratifying than choosing textiles and prints and sewing them yourself!

Next Wednesday, I will tell you about wool alternatives.